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Author Topic: Online Harassment: The Australian Woman’s Experience  (Read 1217 times)

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Offline kat

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Online Harassment: The Australian Woman’s Experience
« on: March 08, 2016, 03:16:58 PM »
To mark International Women's Day Norton Australia (yes the virus/PC safety people) posted the results of a survey they conducted about Women and their experiences online "Online Harassment: The Australian Woman’s Experience" (pdf embedded below).

Pay particular attention to page 13 and keep in mind the context; a survey of Women and their experiences online. 17% of harassment received is from Females versus 14% by Males. If one also assumes females constitutes a majority of "Former Friends" (at 16%) it essentially means that women are more likely to received harassment from other women than they are men.

And this tallies more or less with other reasonably impartial surveys done on the subject (some posted in this topic). Incidentally, and interestingly, page 22 indicates that the vast majority of women took control of the situation (as best they could) and did something about the harassment received, (based on multiple, select all that apply, choice) from simply blocking (41%) to initiating legal (3%)/police action(10%) against individuals.

With that said, the 'report' is not presented in a manner that truly reflects the data they gathered, nor the way that data tells Norton women actually exercise their agency. Instead it perpetuates the stereotyped perception that women are completely powerless damsels, fearful of being on-the-line, when the exact opposite is in fact the case.

[EDIT update Dec 2016] PDF and associated materials appear to be offline. cf. press-release here



Offline ratty redemption

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Re: Online Harassment: The Australian Woman’s Experience
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2016, 08:38:24 PM »
all very interesting. and in the 17 years i've been using online forums and comment sections, i've never noticed any demographic like gender, race, age, class etc being at an obvious disadvantage to another in how they interact with other groups. also some of the most confident and "kick ass" people i've known online are women.

do you think norton's "report" is intentionally appeasing certain political pressure groups, and that they don't expect most people (including myself) to read all of it? ...ie the objective data contradicts the apparent subjective summery?

Offline kat

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Re: Online Harassment: The Australian Woman’s Experience
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2016, 09:10:21 AM »
It's always difficult to ascribe motives without either sounding conspiratorial or being accused of being so. It doesn't go without saying though that Norton branding being all over the materials in question, and the fact that this is released on, or about, International Women's Day, when any other day would have been fine, speaks for itself in terms of "using the day to draw attention to the issue [whilst raising brand awareness]". That must always be a consequence of a 'brand' speaking to an issue (even KatsBits can be accused of this). The question is whether there's 'bad-faith' in their doing so, something that can only be speculated upon unless told otherwise by those involved.

With that said, and on its own, one might argue charitably. Taken as a whole however and the picture changes. For example a tweet from a training outlet (they train individuals in the film industry) showed up in KatsBits timeline stating "Women still only make up 23% of average film crew. We need far more girls in craft and tech roles", the implication being that the low number represents some systemic oppression holding women back from gaining entrance into the industry, a position later confirmed - "Not that they don't want to. Girls often aren't aware of huge range of jobs available. Or they simply can't get in.".

The problem with this is that whilst the statistic may very well be correct, their conclusion misrepresents a broader (and what appears to be a universal) truth; the numbers are low in technical fields because women choose different career paths in the industry, a point backed up by the UK Governments own data; Creative Skillset survey for 2012 (last complete set based on ONS data) has the breakdown for "Film" as follows (generally speaking); women comprise some 46% of the UK film industry on the production side with 64% being in business management, 47% production, 46% creative development, 41% strategic management and 27% art and design[1]. From this it's possible to conclude women appear to gravitate towards jobs that involve dealing with other people. This traditional preference[2] weighs the conclusion that women are underrepresented "in film crew" to be made, which is numerically true, whilst not accounting for over-representation in other quarters - if their general assertion were correct, that women suffer "systemic oppression" and "simply can't get in" (the implication they are being intentionally obstructed in some way), this would be seen across all sectors regardless, which is clearly and demonstrably false.

So are they being disingenuous? Yes, certainly. Are they misrepresenting the facts? Yes. Are they telling lies? No, at least not outright fabrications, as these would be easily falsifiable.



Footnotes
[1] Creative Skillset Employment Census of the Creative Media Industries 2012: "Overall, women in fi lm make up 46% of the total workforce compared to 36% of the creative media industries. Women in film production represented 64% of business management workforce, 47% of production, 46% of creative development, 41% of strategic management and 27% of art and design." [p.33]

[2] Women in STEM are subject to their own biases and locked in gendered thinking as they are influenced by external forces (for good or bad). Data across multiple disciplines and employment sectors carried out by various Institutes and policy initiative indicate women's own choices, prejudices and biases have a greater effect on careers choice/employment status, secondary to their perceptions of a given field.
- Why So Few - Woman in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathmatics
- Women in academic STEM careers. A contribution from the Society of Biology to the House of Commons Science and Technology Select Committee [p. 2].
- Institute for Public Policy Research. Women in engineering [p. 14].
- Iowa State University - STEM Development: A Study of 6th-12th Grade Girls' Interest and Confidence in Mathmatics and Science [pg. 32/33].
 

Offline ratty redemption

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Re: Online Harassment: The Australian Woman’s Experience
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2016, 12:01:21 AM »
understood and agreed. personally i can rarely remember statistics. however, this assertion that men are systematically keeping women out of stem fields doesn't account for most veterinary surgeons and gp's are female. but we don't hear these pressure groups mention those, because it doesn't fit with their gender divisive narrative.

 

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